Skip to Main Content

Breast cancer research images

Pin it

Breast cancer research images

High-resolution copies of images used in this story are linked from the thumbnails below. Please credit the images as indicated.

Dr. Robert Richmond extracts breast cell tissue from one of two liquid nitrogen dewars. Links to 1378x1924-pixel, 926KB JPG. Credit: Dennis Olive, NASA/Marshall Space Flight CenterTwo of several Bioreactors used by Dr. Richmond in his research. Links to 1966x1378-pixel, 764KB JPG. Credit: Dennis Olive, NASA/Marshall Space Flight CenterBreast tissue specimens in traditional sample dishes. Links to 1595x1917-pixel, 1.2MB JPG. Credit: Dennis Olive, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

Dr. Harry Mahtani anlyzes the gas content of nutrient media in the Bioreactors. Links to 1561x1200-pixel, 702KB JPG. Credit: Dennis Olive, NASA/Marshall Space Flight CenterTime-lapse exposure of Bioreactor rotation. Links to 2000x1507-pixel, 1.1MB JPG. Credit: Dennis Olive, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

 

 

Human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor.

  
A cross-section of a construct, grown from surgical specimens of breast cancer, stained for microscopic examination, reveals areas of tumor cells dispersed throughout the non-epithelial cell background. The arrow denotes the foci of breast cancer cells. Links to 1174x766-pixel, 518KB JPG. Credit: Dr. Jeanne Becker, University of South Florida.Higher magnification of view at left. The arrow points to bead surface indicating breast cancer cells (as noted by the staining of tumor cell intermediate filaments). Links to 1179x771-pixel, 405KB JPG. Credit: Dr. Jeanne Becker, University of South Florida.

Human primary breast tumor cells after 49 days of growth in a NASA Bioreactor.

Tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads (indicated by arrow). Links to 1171x796-pixel, 271KB JPG. Credit: Dr. Jeanne Becker, University of South Florida.Higher magnification of view at left, illustrating breast cancer cells with intercellular boundaries on bead surface and aggregates of cells achieving 3-dimensional growth outward from bead. Links to 1165x785-pixel, 339KB JPG. Credit: Dr. Jeanne Becker, University of South Florida.

Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue
(These are enlarged images from the first composite set on the main story)

B: Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneously die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth.
Links to 1441x1101-pixel, 637KB JPG. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center.
C: Isolate of long-term growth HMEC from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and in early full-cell contact growth in culture in a dish.. Links to 1476x1141-pixel, 637KB JPG. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center.D: Same long-term growth HMEC, but after 3 weeks in late full-cell contact growth in a continuous culture in a dish. Note attempts to reform duct elements, but this time in two dimensions in a dish rather than in three dimensions in tissue. Links to 1800x1184-pixel, 748KB JPG. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center.

Note: Image A appears at full resolution in the linked composite on the first page.