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Citizen Scientist Topics

  • Camping Out with the Planets

    2000April 6, 2011

    Earth's slender crescent Moon will glide by two brilliant planets in the dawn sky this week as it heads for a close encounter with Mercury on July 29th. This story also reviews the discovery of a new moon around Jupiter, which was announced last week.

  • Solstice Moon

    2000April 6, 2011

    This week's full Moon, which takes place just four days before the June solstice, will appear unusually big and colorful to observers in the northern hemisphere. The exaggerated size of the low-lying solstice Moon is an illusion, say scientists, but that won't detract from its beauty.

  • Station Sightings

    2000April 6, 2011

    Thanks to a new NASA web site, stargazers can track the progress of the growing International Space Stationfrom their own backyards. Because it reflects sunlight down to Earth, the ISS often looks like a slow-moving star as it crosses the sky. It can even appear as bright as the star Sirius if you know when and where to look.

  • Christmas Eclipse

    2000April 6, 2011

    A solar eclipse is coming on Christmas Day, 2000. The winter landscape across parts of North America will assume an eerie cast, and cooler-than-usual winds might swirl, as the New Moon glides across the face of the Yuletide Sun.

  • A New Star in Space

    2000April 6, 2011

    Something in the heavens is growing brighter and it will soon become one of the most eye-catching stars in the night sky. No it's not a supernova. It's the International Space Station!

  • Bright Planets and Random Meteors

    2000April 6, 2011

    This week's new Moon sets the stage for a sporadic meteor show featuring a cast of eye-catching stars and planets. Random Meteorsare most numerous this time of year in the northern hemisphere.

  • The Hour of the Planets

    2003April 6, 2011

    Dashing out the door to work or school? Pause for a moment and look up. There are two dazzling planets in the morning sky.

  • Harry Potter and the Moons of Jupiter

    2003April 6, 2011

    Blistering-hot volcanoes that belch snow. Moons bigger than planets. Icy worlds with vast underground oceans. All of these things can be found in the latest Harry Potter novel. And according to NASA space probes, they're all real. This week you can see them yourself in the evening sky.

  • Christmas Sunset

    2003April 6, 2011

    Look west as night falls on Dec. 25th for a lovely pairing of brilliant Venus and the crescent moon.

  • Sick of Mars? Try Saturn

    2003April 6, 2011

    Seen enough of Mars? There are some alternatives: Saturn is fast becoming an eye-catching sight in the morning sky, and Jupiter's not bad either.