Highlights

NASA needs your help! You can collaborate with professional scientists, conduct cutting-edge science, and make real discoveries.  A science degree is not required, just a passion for understanding the natural world. Here, you can read news about NASA-funded citizen science projects, new discoveries, and opportunities to get involved. For more information on current citizen science projects.

 

Earth, Citizen Science
Jun 3, 2022
Today we’re saying thank you to everyone who has pitched in to classify wildlife photos at snapshotwisconsin.org. Over the last four years you helped scientists model species distributions, measure vegetation phenology, study how deer use habitats to escape extreme temperatures, and much more.... Read More
Photo of a large bull elk with horns walking up to a trail camera in the woods
Earth
May 10, 2022
When the 10,000th observation was submitted to Mountain Rain or Snow on the morning of March 15th, wet snow was falling on much of the Sierra Nevada. The National Weather Service was predicting slick mountain passes and possible delays due to rain for commuters in the city, but Mountain Rain or... Read More
Photograph of a woman wearing an orange jacket and dark hat standing in a field with trees in the distance while she collects falling snow data on her mobile phone.
Earth, Citizen Science
Apr 21, 2022
It's almost Earth Day – looking for ways to celebrate? Show you care by becoming a NASA citizen scientist! Our citizen science programs are collaborations with NASA scientists and members of the public.
Photo of a hand holding a mobile phone with an Earth Observer application and mountains in the background
Citizen Science
Apr 7, 2022
The FjordPhyto citizen science project has joined the NASA family! This project is a collaboration between researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego (USA) and tour vessel members of the International Association of Antarctica Tour Operators.
FjordPhyto citizen scientists collect seawater and phytoplankton samples to investigate the changing polar marine environment.
Sun, Earth’s Space Environment, Earth
Mar 22, 2022
Sometimes the electrons in the upper atmosphere clump up and form giant waves larger than Texas that zip around the Earth faster than a jet plane! A team of researchers from the NASA/NSF-supported Ham Radio Science Citizen Investigation (HamSCI) led by Nathaniel Frissell at The University of... Read More
Colorful image representing the distance that amateur radio operators can communicate and how that changes over time. Red dots represent a wave-like pattern.
Nov 15, 2021
Have you ever noticed snow falling when the air temperature is above freezing? Your eyes aren’t deceiving you! Temperatures near freezing can bring rain or snow, posing a real challenge for water managers who need to know how much precipitation falls as what type. More accurately predicting rain vs... Read More
Citizen Science Project: Mountain Rain or Snow
Earth, Citizen Science
Apr 22, 2021
Citizen science is a great way to study our beautiful planet. We are #ConnectedByEarth. Astronauts onboard the International Space Station mention the importance of citizen science to studying Earth’s climate.  
Still screen of video of 5 astronauts on the International Space Station
Earth
Apr 12, 2021
Landsat imagery shows that the area covered by kelp forests off the coast of Northern California has dropped by more than 95 percent, with just a few small, isolated patches of bull kelp remaining. Species-rich kelp forests have been replaced by “urchin barrens,” where purple sea urchins cover a... Read More
Underwater photograph of kelp seaweed and fish.
Earth
Oct 26, 2020
Snapshot Wisconsin is a partnership to monitor wildlife year-round, using a statewide network of trail cameras. Citizen scientists help discover wildlife by classifying images captured on trail cameras. The project provides data needed for wildlife management decision support at the Wisconsin... Read More
Three deer standing a lightly snowy field.
Earth, Ice
Aug 17, 2020
Researchers on the NASA-funded Community Snow Observations (CSO) project recently found a new way to use data from citizen scientists. This project asks volunteer to measure the depth of the snow in mountain environments and uses those data to improve snowpack models.
Ryan Crumley measures snow depth in the White Mountains of New Hampshire.