Nasa Wavelength

Time Warp

In this inquiry investigation, students conclude that the motion of the Earth is linked to the changes we observe such as the length of the day. Students learn about the reason behind the Earth's time zones. An optional water clock and sand clock making activity supports this investigation.

Solar Week Wednesday: Learn About the Active Sun

This is a reading associated with activities during Solar Week, a twice-yearly event in March and October during which classrooms are able to interact with scientists studying the Sun. Outside of Solar Week, information, activities, and resources are archived and available online at any time.

Ice in the Shadows

This is a lesson about detecting ice on the permanently shadowed craters of Mercury and the Moon. Learners will consider what might be in that ice and will examine why the polar regions of Earth, Mercury and the Moon are colder than elsewhere on the planets.

Going Down, Anyone?

The force of gravity is the focus of this demonstration using a ruler, string and a paper clip. Students observe that the Earth's gravity is always downward toward the center of the Earth.

Carbon Dioxide Increases during the last 2,000 years

In this problem set, learners will use a graph of carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere of the last 2000 years to answer questions related to increases over time and why scientists link this increase with human activity. Answer key is provided.

Can you hear Me Now? Communicating with Spacecraft

Learners will investigate various ways to improve mission design to maximize the scientific return. In the first activity, students examine how the use of flowcharts can help make computer programs error-free and efficient, in this way making the spacecraft more reliable.

Space Weather Software

This software package displays movies and images of the aurora and the Sun in various wavelengths from the ground and from NASA spacecraft; a tutorial about what space weather is and how the aurora is formed; and more.

Using Mathematical Models to Investigate Planetary Habitability: Activity B Making a Simple Mathematical Mode

In this activity, students build a simple computer model to determine the black body surface temperature of planets in our solar system: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune and Pluto.

Electromagnets

This is an activity about the properties of electromagnets, which is a crucial underpinning for understanding how magnetic fields are generated in nature, in the surface of the Sun, and in the interior of Earth.

Comet on a Stick

In this activity, learners replicate the scientific processes of observing, forming an explanation, revising and communicating about a model of a comet. Learners construct a model of features of a comet using an assortment of common craft supplies.

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