Nasa Wavelength

GLOBE: Clouds eTraining Module

After completing this module, learners will be able to to explain what clouds are and how they form; why clouds are an important element of the Earth system; why cloud observations are important for understanding our changing Earth system.

The Mystery of Blacktail Canyon

During this immersive virtual field trip to the Grand Canyon, learners investigate geologic records to discover what the rocks reveal about life and environments of the past. They will then apply those same investigative techniques to the search for life in the solar system.

Solar Week Friday: Research Jobs & Salaries

This is a reading and research activity associated with activities during Solar Week, a twice-yearly event in March and October during which classrooms are able to interact with scientists studying the Sun.

Astro101 Slide Set: Shockingly Bright Pulsars

This slide set focuses on the discovery of an extremely bright pulsar in the galaxy M82 by the NuSTAR mission, with support from the Chandra and Swift missions.

Does Air Contain Water Vapor?

In this activity, students monitor the change that takes place when water vapor condenses from a gas to a liquid and see how a change in temperature affects this transformation.

Estimating Cloud Cover

Working in pairs or small groups, students use construction paper to simulate cloud cover. They estimate the percentage of cloud cover represented by torn pieces of paper on a contrasting background and assign a cloud cover classification to the simulations created by their classmates.

Hurricanes

The emphasis of this lesson is deepening students' understanding of how and why we measure precipitation across the globe.

Angling for Gamma Ray Bursts

In this activity, students determine the direction to a gamma ray burst using the times it is detected by three different spacecraft located somewhere in the solar system.

Design Challenge: Shielding a Magnetometer

Students will test various materials to determine if any can shield their "magnetometer" (compass) from an external magnetic field using their own experimental design. If no suitable material is available, they will devise another method to protect their instrument.

Ice Zones: Where We Look for Ice

In this activity, learners draw conclusions about where on a planetary body scientists might look for ice and why. They use a clay ball, ice cubes, and a heat lamp to model the permanently-shadowed polar regions of planets and moons that may harbor ice.

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