NASA Wavelength

SciJinks: Weather Folklore

This interactive resource explores weather folklore tales from around the world, and contrasts them with scientific facts. SciJinks is a joint NASA/NOAA educational website targeting middle school-aged children and their educators.

GLOBE: Contrail Formation Tutorial

In this interactive tutorial, learners can explore the physics of contrail formation in the atmosphere and develop the ability to recognize the several types of contrails that form under varying atmospheric conditions. Practice classifying the type and abundance of contrails.

Coastal Upwelling: Upwelling and Remote Sensing-Other Considerations

This self-paced, interactive tutorial examines upwelling in non-coastal regions of the ocean as well as the factors that influence algal blooms.

How to Talk to a Spacecraft: Binary Code

NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory uses binary code to gather information about Earth's surface. That code, in the form of two numbers (1's and 0's) is then read and converted by computers into images.

What is an Oscillation Amplitude?

This is an activity about oscillation. Learners will observe, time, and graph the data of the side to side motion of the mirror used in the soda bottle magnetometer activity to determine the mirror's oscillation amplitude.

Women in the High-Energy Universe

Women connected with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory share their personal career motivations and career advice.

Size and Scale of the Universe

In this hands-on activity, students learn about the different realms of the Universe and explore their sizes and relative scales.

How does the Sun Shine?

This textbook chapter introduces Earth’s external energy source, and the nuclear fusion reactions that power the Sun, space weather and space storms. There is an interview with solar scientist, Dr. Janet Luhmann, UC-Berkeley.

Cronologia del Infrarrojo!

This Spanish website is a timeline where you can view the past, present and future of Infrared Astronomy. It talks about the different infrared telescopes of the past and present and how they impacted astronomy.

Wow, Saturn is Much Bigger than Earth!

Learners will compare the sizes of Saturn and Earth by making to-scale illustrations. Students also label and caption their illustrations using scientific language. This is lesson 3 of 10 in "Reading, Writing & Rings!" for grades 1-2.

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