NASA Wavelength Resources Collection

NASA Wavelength is a collection of resources that incorporate NASA content and have been subject to peer review. You can search this collection using key words and/or the drop down menus to pinpoint resources to use with your audience of learners.
1902 result(s)

A Spectral Mystery

Learners will use a spectrograph to gather data about light sources. Using the data they’ve collected, students are able to make comparisons between different light sources and make conjectures about the composition of a mystery light source.

Maya Math

This simple exercise demonstrates how Maya numbers are written and how higher place values of numbers are calculated. This activity can also be used in informal education settings with people ages 9 through adult.

Kepler Star Wheels

This is a make-it-yourself planisphere designed to show where Kepler is pointing. Learners can use it to locate exoplanets around stars in the night sky.

A Field View of Soil - Digging Around

In this field activity, students learn about the five soil-forming factors and their influence on soil properties such as moisture, temperature, color and texture.

STEREO Lithograph

This is a lithograph about the Sun. Learners will read a short description about the two Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory, or STEREO, spacecraft. On one side of the lithograph, learners can view a two-dimensional image of the Sun taken by STEREO.

Deep Impact Videos and Animations

This is a legacy site for videos and animations related to the Deep Impact mission and encounter with Tempel 1. Learners can watch videos about the mission, encounter, science, and results.

Modeling the Motions of Earth, Moon and Sun

The purpose of this kinesthetic activity is for students to learn the relative motions of the Earth, Sun and Moon. Awareness of these different motions is needed to develop an understanding of the causes of the day/night cycle, the seasons and the cycle of lunar phases.

Strange New Planet

Explore simulated remote sensing techniques to observe a clay model of a planet. Observations are done from the perspective of a telescope at Earth’s surface, a telescope above Earth’s atmosphere, and from closer proximity to the planet in a fly-by, an orbit and a landing.

MRC: Present Skills and Rovers (Grades 3-5)

In this lesson, students participate in a skit presenting a mock-up of a planetary surface rover they designed.

Probability and Traffic Signals

Using the simple example of calculating the probability of reaching a traffic light while green, students are shown how to build a mathematical model using a very commonly-taught formula (sum of first n integers) to solve a rather practical problem.

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