NASA Wavelength Resources Collection

NASA Wavelength is a collection of resources that incorporate NASA content and have been subject to peer review. You can search this collection using key words and/or the drop down menus to pinpoint resources to use with your audience of learners.
1902 result(s)

Play Dough Planets

Learners will demonstrate the size (volume) differences between Earth, Earth's Moon, and Mars. An extension is provided to estimate the distance between the Earth and the Moon, and the Earth and Mars, using the scale of the play dough planets' sizes.

Just Passing Through (Intermediate Version)

Students will time the flow of water through soils with different properties and measure the amount of water held in these soils.

Square Roots Using a Carpenter's Square

In a mechanical demonstration of the Pythagorean theorem, this example provides a practical, hands-on method for deriving square roots using a carpenter's square.

Mars Bingo

This is a classroom bingo-style game about vocabulary and concepts related to Mars and Mars missions. A list of vocabulary words and their definitions is provided.

S'COOL Data Analysis Tutorial

In preparation for analyzing student cloud observations taken as part of the S'COOL project, this tutorial, consisting of a 29-slide powerpoint, presents step-by-step instructions for selecting data, reviewing results, searching observations on results, analyzing data on cloud cover, cloud l

THEMIS Magnetometer Line-Plots

This is an activity about the properties and characteristics of Earth’s magnetic field as shown through magnetometer data and its 3D vector nature.

S'COOL: Intro to Clouds/Sky Watcher Chart

This resource is a joint NASA/NOAA cloud identification chart with explanations.

Permanent Bar Magnets

This is an activity about the basic properties of magnets and magnetism. Learners explore concepts such as magnetic fields and polarity, which form the basic ingredients of a study of Earth's magnetic field and the technology of magnetometers.

ClimateBits: Ozone Hole

This brief (2:04) video explains the ozone hole over Antarctica - the annual thinning of stratospheric ozone caused by manufactured chemicals. Twenty-five years after the Montreal Protocol limited the use of ozone depleting chemicals, scientists are starting to see signs of recovery.

Infectious Disease and Climate Change: Is Climate Change Responsible for the Spread of West Nile Virus?

Temperature increases associated with global climate change have led to concerns that infectious diseases common in warmer tropical and subtropical climates may become more common in warming middle altitudes.

Pages