NASA Wavelength Resources Collection

NASA Wavelength is a collection of resources that incorporate NASA content and have been subject to peer review. You can search this collection using key words and/or the drop down menus to pinpoint resources to use with your audience of learners. will add to ticket
1877 result(s)

How to Draw Magnetic Fields - I

This is an activity about depicting magnetic fields. Learners will observe two provided drawings of magnetic field line patterns for bar magnets in simple orientations of like and unlike polarities and carefully draw the field lines for both orientations.

S'COOL Lesson: Piece of the Sky: Introductory Activity for Making S'COOL Observations

Cloud cover is a fundamental observation in the S'COOL project. The ability to reasonably estimate the percentage of cloud cover is introduced and practiced in this activity.

Picturing an Astronomer

This is an activity about assumptions and stereotypes. Learners will first sketch what they perceive an astronomer looks like. After, they will together discuss their images and research the preparation that is required to become an astronomer.

Zooming In

Students examine a series of remotely-sensed images of the US, scaling from the continent to San Francisco, and distinguish the concepts of scale and resolution. At greater resolution, students are able to identify different land classes on the map, using the color key for false color images.

Getting to Know Soil

Each student will make predictions about the properties of various soil samples. Then they will examine several types of soils and record their observations. Next, they will learn about soil profiles and horizons by both examining a soil sample in a jar and by creating a soil profile flip chart.

What Can We Learn About The Sun From Shadows?

This is an activity about light and shadow. Learners will make outdoor sundials. They will use the sundial and the length of the shadow that is cast to explore the relationship between the size and position of the shadows and the position of the Sun in the sky.

Dollar$ or Cent$

It is common in the real world to see mathematical examples where the cents sign was used when the dollar sign was supposed to be used. Converting and comparing decimals and fractions can help clear up this misconception.

Eclipses and Moon Phases

In this lesson, students explore how eclipses happen and why Einstein needed a total eclipse to image stars near the Sun in order to demonstrate how the Sun's mass bends the light from a far away star.

Just How Far is that Star?

In this investigation, students use "point-source" light, light meters, and graphing software to quantify the reduction in light over distance. Through careful measurement of light received at several distances, students discover the best fit of the data is the inverse square rule.

When a Ruler is Too Short

This activity lets students measure distances in the classroom using parallax. The exercise can be done either at a high school level using trigonometric functions, or at a middle school level using simple arithmetic approximations to the trigonometric functions.

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