NASA Wavelength Resources Collection

NASA Wavelength is a collection of resources that incorporate NASA content and have been subject to peer review. You can search this collection using key words and/or the drop down menus to pinpoint resources to use with your audience of learners.
1902 result(s)

Infant Moon: Moon mix!

Learners model how an ocean of molten rock "magma" produced the Moon's oldest rocks. Dense materials in the molten mixture sank, while the least dense materials floated to the top and cooled to form the light-colored areas we see on the Moon today.

Lunar Roving Vehicle

In this activity, learners will construct a model of a lunar roving vehicle. This activity is in Unit 2 of the Exploring the Moon teachers guide, which is designed for use especially, but not exclusively, with the Lunar Sample Disk program.

GPM: The Fresh (water) Connection

In this brief video, NASA scientists discuss the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission and its role in studying and tracking Earth's freshwater resources.

Weighing a Galaxy

In this activity, students use Newton's Laws of Motion, and the motions of the planets, to determine the mass of the sun. They then use the same techniques to determine the mass of a galaxy. In doing so, students convert among different units of measure used in astronomy.

GPM Core Observatory Paper Model

This activity allows participants to build a paper model of the GPM Core Observatory and learn about the technology the satellite uses to measure precipitation from space. Directions explain how to cut, fold and glue the individual pieces together to make the model.

What Are the Human-Caused Sources of Carbon Dioxide?

This activity presents a digital interactive where students identify anthropogenic sources of carbon dioxide and their relative contribution to carbon enrichment of the atmosphere.

Erosion and Landslides

Students will be introduced to the causes, locations, and hazards of landslides, as well as the role of satellite observations in predicting and studying them.

Solar Week Monday: Do the Activity - Do You See What I See?

This is an online lesson associated with activities during Solar Week, a twice-yearly event in March and October during which classrooms are able to interact with scientists studying the Sun. This activity is scheduled to occur during Monday of Solar Week.

What do Satellite Images Tell Us About Mars?

Learners will compare satellite images of Mars and Earth to look for similar features. Then they brainstorm a list of forces or events that could have caused some of these features to form on Mars. This is activity 3 of 9 in Mars and Earth: Science Learning Activities for After School.

Mars in the Future!

In this lesson, students imagine Mars to be a future vacation destination, and will need to encourage people to come and visit. Students will create a scripted travel video or commercial, or construct a brochure or website to convince people to visit a fictitious base on Mars.

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