Nasa Wavelength

Gamma Ray Burst Distribution on the Sky: The Plots Thicken

In this activity, students look at the distribution of aluminum foil balls arranged in a circle on the floor, and compare them to the distribution of gamma-ray bursts on the sky.

Spheres of Earth

The activity introduces students to aspects of the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and litho/geosphere and how they are interrelated. It is designed to promote an interest in authentic investigations of Earth using images acquired by astronauts as the hook.

How Do Paths Look From Different Perspectives?

Using both literature (a book featuring a path, such as Little Red Riding Hood) and satellite images, students will identify paths, observe and analyze them from different altitudes, and distinguish natural paths from those made by humans.

Einstein and His Times

In this lesson, students will read about and research the major historical events that occurred throughout the year 1919. They will use different readings and articles to understand and describe what life was like during this time.

Space Math - I

This is a booklet containing 20 problem sets that involve a variety of math skills, including equations and substitution, time calculations, reading, algebra, and more. Each set of problems is contained on one page.

The Scoop on Moon Dirt

In this two-part activity, learners compare how soil forms on Earth and the Moon. They examine different soil samples and compare them to lunar "soil" simulant. They explore how water, wind, and impactors help to make soil. This activity is part of Explore! To the Moon and Beyond!

NASA eClips™ 4D Guide Lites: Solar Images

Learners begin this 5E activity by creating their own picture of the sun out of paint and detergent. They then make colored filters out of cellophane and paper towel tubes to simulate how specialized instruments capture and view solar images.

The Universe as Scientists Know It

In this activity, the student will be able to assess their understanding of what makes up the universe, by filling in a concept map with the following terms: Planetary Systems, Galaxies, Planets, Sun, Venus, Moon, Stars, Sirius, Solar System, Comet, Meteor, Open Clusters, Stellar Regions, Jupiter

SciJinks: Why is the Sky Blue?

The bending and scattering of sunlight to create blue skies and red sunsets is explained and illustrated in this article. SciJinks is a joint NASA/NOAA educational website targeting middle school-aged children and their educators.

MY NASA DATA: Is Grandpa Right, Were Winters Colder When He Was a Boy?

In this activity, students use historic weather information and compare it with current data to determine if they can see a trend in temperature change over time.

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