Nasa Wavelength

What is Color?

This comic addresses the question "What is color?" Using the Sun as an example, the comic discusses how visible light (white light) contains all the colors of the rainbow. It goes on to describe why our Sun is white, our sky is blue, and why sunsets are red/orange.

Some Unusual Pathways

Photos and images taken from the space shuttle are used to show unusual paths, such as those created by smoke, camel tracks, lava flows, and river deltas.

Sam Finnigan's Big Secret

Learners will read about missions to asteroids and comets, consider the measurements and math required for the robotic spacecraft to visit these objects, and are invited to finish the story themselves.

IMAGE Satellite 1/4-scale Model

This is an activity about scale model building.

Black Hole Explorer Game

This board game challenges players (ages 10+) to build a spaceship and fly to a black hole. The game provides opportunities for understanding phenomena based on current black hole research.

There's Air in There!

In this demonstration, a soda bottle, paper and straws are used to show learners that air has mass and takes up space.

Practicing Your Protocols

In this lab-based activity, students learn how to use scientific instruments used to take hydrological data. Students will rotate among measurement stations for each of the hydrology protocols that will be done by the class.

Areology - The Study of Mars

Learners will use candy bars, straws and other materials to simulate the extraction of a Martian core sample and how to derive observations about the history and make-up of Mars. This is activity 3 of 25 from the collection, Mars Activities.

Vesta Mosaic: Art informing science

This is an activity about albedo, which is a measurement of the reflectance of a planetary surface. Learners will classify areas on an image in terms of albedo values and then sketch their own portion of an image from space.

Space Place: The Moon's Phases in Oreos

This article explains the monthly variations in the Moon's appearance as seen from Earth. Directions for using Oreo cookies to illustrate the four major phases of the Moon are provided. The article is targeted to children ages 10-12.

Pages