News Articles

What's Up in the Solar System
Solar System
Mar 5, 2019
What can you see in the March sky? Jupiter and other planets in the morning, a change of seasons and an open star cluster called the Beehive.
Solar System
Feb 15, 2019
Scientists who study the solar system tend to ask big questions: How was our solar system formed? Where did the building blocks of life come from? What hazards from above threaten life on our planet? To find answers, they’re looking more and more at small worlds.   
Big Questions About Small Worlds Poster
Solar System
Feb 4, 2019
Remember the old adage: Big things come in small packages? NASA has updated it - in the form of CubeSats. Imagine a real, working satellite that’s so small you can hold it in your hands: Just 4 inches (10 cm) across, these cubes can be expanded incrementally depending on their specific mission... Read More
Small Satellites yield Big Discoveries Poster
Solar System, Sky Watching
Dec 12, 2018
People around the world have the opportunity to participate in the study of a comet in December of 2018, when a hyperactive comet that orbits between Jupiter and the Sun will be closest to Earth. It will be so close, in fact, that you may be able to see it with the naked eye within a week or two... Read More
You Light Up Our Night Poster
Solar System
Dec 7, 2018
December brings the Geminids, a visible comet, and a fond farewell.
What's Up in the Solar System
Solar System
Dec 3, 2018
After traveling through space for more than two years and over two billion miles, NASA’s Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) spacecraft arrived at its destination, asteroid Bennu, on Monday, Dec. 3, 2018. The spacecraft will spend... Read More
This series of images taken by the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft shows Bennu in one full rotation from a distance of around 50 miles (80 km). The spacecraft’s PolyCam camera obtained the thirty-six 2.2-millisecond frames over a period of four hours and 18 minutes.
Solar System
Nov 5, 2018
What's Up for November? Planets, asteroid Juno, comet 46P, and a morning meteor shower.
What's Up in the Solar System
Solar System, Planets of Our Solar System
Oct 23, 2018
Lightning is as beautiful as it is powerful – a violent, hotter than the surface of the Sun electrical marvel. But might lightning on other planets be even more astonishing?  Consider this. When Voyager 1 flew by Jupiter in 1979, its imager captured areas nearly as big as the U.S. lit up by... Read More
Lightning Across the Solar System Poster
Solar System
Oct 9, 2018
What's Up for October? International Observe the Moon Night!
What's Up in the Solar System
Solar System
Sep 4, 2018
What's Up for September? Set your sights beyond the solar system, and take a late summertime road-trip along the Milky Way.
What's Up September 2018
Solar System
Aug 1, 2018
Dark moonless nights for the summer Perseid Meteor Shower!
What's Up August 2018
Solar System
Jul 11, 2018
New research from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft’s up-close Grand Finale orbits shows a surprisingly powerful and dynamic interaction of plasma waves moving from Saturn to its rings and its moon Enceladus. The observations show for the first time that the waves travel on magnetic field lines connecting... Read More
Image of sound waves
Solar System, Mars, Planets of Our Solar System
Jul 6, 2018
July's night skies feature Mars opposition on the 27th, when Mars, Earth, and the Sun all line up, and Mars' closest approach to Earth since 2003 on the 31st. That means great Mars viewing, though the planet-wide Martian dust storm will make seeing details more difficult.
What's Up July 2018
Solar System
Jun 30, 2018
On February 15, 2013, a house-sized meteor entered into Earth’s atmosphere at over 40,000 mph and exploded 14 miles above Chelyabinsk, Russia. The blast – wielding more than 30 times the energy of the Hiroshima atom bomb – generated a shock wave that shattered windows and damaged buildings in... Read More
The International Asteroid Hunt Poster
Solar System, Mars
Jun 21, 2018
This is a story more than 4.5 billion years in the making. We’ve always referred to Mars as the red planet because of its surface color. But what’s below that dusty crust? We don’t know.  
New InSight into the Red Planet Poster