Earth Science Research News

Earth News and Information

NASA is responsible for collecting much of the data that people use to explain humanity’s environmental impact on Earth, from documenting climate change and its impacts on ice, sea level and weather patterns, to monitoring the health of forests and the movement of freshwater. But NASA doesn’t just... Read More
The long voyage of one of the planet’s largest bergs—A-68A—has come to an end.
Everything in our planet — the land, the water, the air, us — is intertwined by the various chemical, physical, and biological processes that make up the huge system we call planet Earth. One of the key components of that system is the cryosphere, or all of Earth’s frozen water.
Everything in our planet — the land, the water, the air, us — is intertwined by the various chemical, physical, and biological processes that make up the huge system we call planet Earth. One of the key components of that system is the cryosphere, or all of Earth’s frozen water.
In June 2020, a "Godzilla" dust plume travelled from the Sahara, the planet’s largest, hottest desert, across the Atlantic ocean to North America. Saharan dust plumes are a natural phenomenon and occur especially during the summertime, due to dust uplift from low level jets and haboobs... Read More
Data Sources: Atlantic Mutlidecadal Oscillation (AMO) Index. The AMO Index is a monthly index of the North Atlantic temperatures from 1856 to present. This data visualization utilized the smoothed, long version of the AMO index. The data is available here: https://psl.noaa.gov/data/timeseries/... Read More
From the vantage point of space, NASA’s fleet of Earth-observing satellites investigates connections between ecosystems that are continents apart, or right next door.
NASA has awarded the United States Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) Support Services contract to ICF Incorporated LLC of Fairfax, Virginia.
With data from a 2016 expedition, scientists supported by NASA are shedding more light into the complex processes under the Greenland Ice Sheet that control how fast its glaciers slide toward the ocean and contribute to sea level rise.
Sea ice in the Arctic appears to have hit its annual maximum extent after growing through the fall and winter. This year’s maximum extent peaked at 5.70 million square miles, making it the seventh-smallest on record and tied with 2007.
Sea ice in the Arctic appears to have hit its annual maximum extent after growing through the fall and winter. This year’s maximum extent peaked at 5.70 million square miles, making it the seventh-smallest on record and tied with 2007.
Earth is on a budget – an energy budget. Our planet is constantly trying to balance the flow of energy in and out of Earth’s system. But human activities are throwing that off balance, causing our planet to warm in response.
As a leading agency observing and understanding environmental changes to Earth, NASA has joined the National Climate Task Force.