Voyager

Interstellar Messengers

active Mission

Voyager 1 and its twin Voyager 2 are the only spacecraft ever to operate outside the heliosphere, the protective bubble of particles and magnetic fields generated by the Sun. Voyager 1 reached the interstellar boundary in 2012, while Voyager 2 (traveling slower and in a different direction than its twin) reached it in 2018.

Mission Type

Multiple Flybys

launch

1977

Science Targets

Outer Solar System, Interstellar Space

Status

Extended Mission

The Interstellar Mission

After completing the first in-depth reconnaissance of the outer planets, the twin Voyagers are on a new mission to chart the edge of interstellar space.

The mission objective of the Voyager Interstellar Mission (VIM) is to extend the NASA exploration of the solar system beyond the neighborhood of the outer planets to the outer limits of the Sun's sphere of influence, and possibly beyond.

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A labeled line drawing of the Voyager Spacecraft. Locations of instruments are shown.
NASA/JPL-Caltech

Voyager 1

The most distant human-made object.

Voyager 1 entered interstellar space on Aug. 25, 2012.. The spacecraft was 11.3 billion miles (18.3 billion kilometers, or 122 astronomical units) away from the sun at that time. It was 11.3 billion miles (18.2 billion kilometers, or 121 astronomical units) from Earth.

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Animated GIF showing the family portrait image from the perspective of Voyager 1 in 1990.
This data visualization uses actual spacecraft trajectory data to show the family portrait image from Voyager 1's perspective in February 1990.
NASA/JPL-Caltech

Voyager 2

The only spacecraft to visit Uranus and Neptune.

Voyager 2 took advantage of a rare planetary alignment that occurs once every 175 years to explore t all four giant planetary systems in our solar system - Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune.

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Neptune Full Disk View
This picture of Neptune was taken by Voyager 2 less than five days before the spacecraft’s closest approach of the planet on Aug. 25, 1989. The picture shows the "Great Dark Spot" – a storm in Neptune's atmosphere – and the bright, light-blue smudge of clouds that accompanies the storm.
NASA/JPL

Frenquently Asked Questions

Two dozen answers to the most popular Voyager questions.

Where is Voyager 1 going? When will it get there? What about Voyager 2? Can the cameras be turned back on? The answers are here.

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Animated GIF showing the family portrait image from the perspective of Voyager 1 in 1990.
This data visualization uses actual spacecraft trajectory data to show the family portrait image from Voyager 1's perspective in February 1990.
NASA/JPL-Caltech

The Pale Blue Dot

The behind-the-scenes story of the making of Voyager 1's iconic image of Earth as "a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam."

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Earth as a tiny bluish dot suspended in a grainy beam of light.
A 3D model of NASA's twin Voyager spacecraft.
NASA Visualization Technology Applications and Development (VTAD)
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