Science News

Science@NASA

 

Sun, Earth’s Space Environment
Jan 24, 2018
Like Earth, space has weather. Except instead of swirling winds and downpours of precipitation, space weather is defined by shifting electric and magnetic fields and rains of charged particles. At the very beginning of space, starting just 60 miles above Earth’s surface, there’s a layer of the... Read More
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Earth’s Space Environment
Dec 18, 2017
Researchers are developing new types of magnetometers for use on future small satellites that not only fulfill stringent requirements for low-amplitude and high-precision measurements, they are also enabling the team to develop a new approach to achieving highquality magnetic measurements from... Read More
Photo of magnetometer circuit next to penny for scale
Earth, Earth’s Space Environment
Oct 23, 2017
In 2016, scientists at Goddard Space Flight Center produced mirrors with the highest reflectance ever reported in the farultraviolet spectral range. To develop these mirrors, the team developed a new three-step physical vapor deposition process to coat aluminum mirrors with protective magnesium... Read More
The ICON FUV spectrograph.
Sun, Our Sun, Earth’s Space Environment
Jun 27, 2017
High up in the clear blue noontime sky, the sun appears to be much the same day-in, day-out, year after year. But astronomers have long known that this is not true. The sun does change. Properly-filtered telescopes reveal a fiery disk often speckled with dark sunspots. Sunspots are strongly... Read More
Solar Minimum is Coming Poster
Sun, Our Sun, Earth’s Space Environment
Jun 27, 2017
Intense solar activity such as sunspots and solar flares subsides during solar minimum, but that doesn’t mean the sun becomes dull. Solar activity simply changes form.
Solar Minimum is Coming Poster
Sun, Earth’s Space Environment
May 16, 2017
Sounding rocket missions can often be the key to getting a quick answer to a tightly focused science question.
NASA's Sounding Rockets Poster
Sun, Earth’s Space Environment
May 16, 2017
The spectacle of a mammoth rocket ‘breaking the surly bonds of Earth’ takes our breath away. Equally amazing are the secrets revealed to us by science missions these rockets have launched – and NASA puts careful thought into what kind of mission will best achieve that science. Sometimes a large,... Read More
NASA's Sounding Rockets Poster
Earth’s Space Environment
Mar 2, 2017
Technology Infused: NASA-sponsored technology has been employed to develop a state-of-the-art heat shield that will enable an important Heliophysics mission—the Solar Probe Plus (SPP). The newly developed carboncomposite heat shield will protect the spacecraft from the impacts from hypervelocity... Read More
Illustration of Solar Probe approaching orange and yellow sun
Sun, Earth’s Space Environment
Sep 21, 2016
Four NASA spacecraft have performed a thrilling maneuver to understand the physics of explosive reconnection in Earth's magnetosphere.
NASA Spacecraft Fly in Record-setting Formation Poster
Sun, Earth’s Space Environment
Sep 21, 2016
Summertime airshows are fun to watch, especially when aircraft fly in tight formation. The sight of airplanes soaring overhead practically wingtip to wingtip is thrilling to behold. Four of NASA’s spacecraft recently performed an equally thrilling maneuver: In Oct. 2015, the satellites of NASA’s... Read More
NASA Spacecraft Fly in Record-setting Formation Poster 2
Earth’s Space Environment
Aug 25, 2016
Image of magnetic loops (flux ropes) on the sun, captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO).
Image of colorful loops shooting out of the sun.
Sun, Earth’s Space Environment
Aug 16, 2016
Summer is the season for electric-blue noctilucent clouds. NASA's AIM spacecraft is finding that these clouds continue to reveal details about how the atmosphere works.
Sun, Earth’s Space Environment
Aug 16, 2016
Northern summer is underway. It’s time for picnics, hot dogs, dips in the pool... …and, oh yes, electric blue sunsets.
Earth, Sun, Earth’s Space Environment
Jun 14, 2016
Dynamic bubbles of ionization in Earth's upper atmosphere can cause GPS signals to "twinkle" like stars, affecting the quality of navigation on Earth below. NASA recently conducted a mission called CINDI to investigate this phenomenon.
Twinkle Twinkle GPS Poster 1